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BMA Foundation for Medical Research Awards Ceremony 2018

Celebrating the BMA Foundation’s continued support for medical research

The BMA Foundation has been supporting medical research since 1839 through awarding grants and prizes that encourage medical research. To celebrate this, each year we host an awards ceremony for the annual grant winners, as well as inviting back some of our past winners to talk about the impact BMA Foundation grants have had on their career and research field. This is an excellent chance to celebrate the success of the grant winners, and the BMA Foundation’s continued support for medical research of the highest quality.

This year, the awards ceremony took place on 6 November at BMA House and was Bollywood themed. The event was attended by over 160 guests, including potential donors, philanthropists, key members of the medical research community, Parliamentarians and charity sector leaders. An after dinner speech was delivered by Alastair Campbell, best known for his roles as spokesperson, Chief Press Secretary and Director of Strategy for former British Prime Minister Tony Blair.

Read all about the winners of this year's grants.

 

Gallery

2018 BMA Foundation awards ceremony

 

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  • Previous grant success

    The BMA Foundation for Medical Research has had a significant impact on the careers of grant winners and on the many areas our grants fund. When we surveyed past grant winners, 92 per cent said that winning a BMA Foundation grant contributed to their career progression. 

    At this year’s ceremony, we invited two past grant winners to present to us on the benefits of securing grant funding from the BMA Foundation for Medical Research.

     

    Dr Rina Dutta

    Margaret Temple 2007, 2011, 2014

    Dr Rina Dutta is a Consultant Psychiatrist at the Maudsley Hospital and Clinician Scientist Fellow of the Health Foundation/Academy of Medical Sciences, working at King’s College London. Dr Dutta was awarded the BMA Foundation Margaret Temple grant in 2007, 2011 and 2014. These grants funded two projects: one on suicide and premature death following a first episode of psychosis and another about the role of insight on suicide in the early stages of schizophrenia. This second project then led to a comparative cohort study between patients in South East London and a comparable group of patients in Spain. Dr Dutta’s research interests include suicide, self-harm, premature mortality, mental and physical co-morbidities, the linkage of datasets and use of social media data for clinical research.

     

    Professor Dominick Shaw

    James Trust 2010, 2017

     

    Professor Dominick Shaw is a Professor of Respiratory Medicine and an Honorary Consultant at the University of Nottingham and Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust. Professor Shaw was awarded the BMA James Trust grant in 2010 and again in 2017, which funded two projects. The first was on predicting the response of asthma patients to azithromycin therapy and the second on understanding the relationships and risks of asthma, steroids and osteoporosis. He specialises in campus to clinic research with a main research interest in severe asthma and has published some of the most highly cited papers in this field over the past 10 years.

     

  • Fundraising

    Funding for the BMA Foundation for Medical Research is made possible through donations and gifts in wills. 

    By celebrating the important research funded by the BMA Foundation, and the success of the grants over the years, we hope others will be encouraged to support the foundation. Every gift makes a real and lasting difference to medical research. 

    If you have any questions about the BMA Foundation, or are thinking of giving a gift to medical research, please contact the BMA Foundation team at researchgrants@bma.org.uk or telephone 020 7383 6341 . For further information click here.